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Friday, April 28, 2017

Venezuela pulling out of OEA likely move toward isolation


After the vote, Venezuelan Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez announced that Caracas on Thursday will begin the procedure of leaving the OAS after the worldwide body voted to hold the meeting without her countrys approval. The foreign ministry and President Nicolas Maduro will forward a letter to the OAS on Thursday stating that “Venezuela will not participate in any activities that promote interventionism”, Rodriguez said, adding that the exit process will take 24 months. OAS Secretary General Luis Almagro has previously branded Maduro, an elected socialist, a “dictator” for stifling the opposition. But the government says the country is suffering from the effects of economic sabotage carried out by the business elite. More…

As Venezuela Declines, So Does Its Latin American Influence


A document circulating in Peru, part of a broad political corruption investigation, stands as a quaint piece of Hugo Chávez memorabilia. It's a 2006 letter allegedly penned by the late socialist Venezuelan president to one of his regional comrades, Peruvian presidential candidate Ollanta Humala. It suggests Chávez gave Humala's campaign $2 million in what the letter calls "revolutionary aid." Humala, who became Peru's president in 2011 and left office last year, denies taking cash from Chávez. But the letter recalls something larger: a time when Venezuela wielded clout. A decade ago, as crude prices soared above $100 a barrel, the South American nation with the world's largest oil reserves was a petro sugar daddy. The firebrand Chávez cast his largesse from the Bahamas to Buenos Aires, buying influence for his left-wing, anti-U.S. revolution. More…

Can Colombia’s peace help Venezuela’s conflict?


Yet the truth commission, along with other parts of a 2016 historic peace deal, could achieve another purpose. Colombia’s peace process might give hope to neighboring Venezuela. That country is quickly plunging into violence between pro-democracy protesters and the security forces of an autocratic leader, President Nicolás Maduro. Venezuela’s rising violence has already brought some attempts at mediation and reconciliation. Much of the rest of Latin America, for example, seeks a new election in Venezuela. And in a poignant message, the son of the country’s pro-government human rights ombudsman used a YouTube video this week to call on his father, Tarek Saab, to “end the injustice that has sunk this country.” More…

What’s next in Venezuela’s crisis: a regionally-brokered solution?

Facing a growing death toll from its brutal repression of protesters, growing international isolation following its suspension of South American trade bloc Mercosur and its departure under pressure from the Organization of American States, increasing cracks within the government and an increasingly desperate economic situation, Maduro may have no choice but to accept a "group of friendly countries" to seek a face-saving way out of its crisis. More…



Chavismo Becomes 'El Chupacabra' Of Venezuelan Democracy


El Chupacabra is a never-before-seen creature that's like one part vampire, one part wild dog. It sucks the life out of small mammals. Goats (cabra) are its preferred meal. From Texas to Latin America, the creature is a rural myth, a story for the locals. The ruling Socialists United Party of Venezuela (PSUV) is the chupacabra of Caracas. It has sucked the lifeblood out of Venezuelan democracy. It's leader, the late Hugo Chavez, is also a mythical creature. He modeled his politics on Simon Bolivar, a 19th-century leader who wanted to unite the indigenous populations of northern South America against their Spanish colonial masters. More…